Radon  testing services

About 1 out of every 15 homes in the United States have a level of radon that is too high. Radon is a cancer causing, radioactive gas that you cannot see, smell, or taste. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that it is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers.

According to EPA, radon comes from the natural (radioactive) breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water and gets into the air you breathe. It finds its way into homes through cracks and holes in the foundation, construction joints, and plumbing fixtures

Radon has also been found in private well water in areas with rocks that contain uranium or radium. If radon is in your well water, it may enter your home and the air you breathe when the water is used for showering and other activities around the house. Water containing radon is typically not a problem in homes served by public water systems.

Distribution Averages by SC DHEC

Radon Test Services

 

Radon Test Provide Upstate South Carolina

Our testing

Get More For Your Money


We follow all testing guidelines and best practices as set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  Our short-term test will be a minimum of 48 hours to ensure that we are able to take a proper reading of your home’s levels.  

In the event that your home reads higher than the maximum safe level of 4 pCi/L we will provide you with a second short-term test at 50% off the original test fee.  We want to help be a part of ensuring that your home is a safe and healthy home.

View a Sample Test Results Report

Contact Us today to schedule your test appointment.

Home Buyer’s and seller’s guide to Radon


Home Buyer’s and Seller’s Guide to Radon

(EPA 402/K-13/002, March 2018)

This booklet is intended for anyone who is buying or selling a home, real estate and relocation professionals, home inspectors and others.

READ MORE

Radon Risk Comparison Charts

Radon Risk If You Smoke

Radon Level If 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*… The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**… WHAT TO DO: 
Stop smoking and…
20 pCi/L About 260 people could get lung cancer 250 times the risk of drowning Fix your home
10 pCi/L About 150 people could get lung cancer 200 times the risk of dying in a home fire Fix your home
8 pCi/L About 120 people could get lung cancer 30 times the risk of dying in a fall Fix your home
4 pCi/L About 62 people could get lung cancer 5 times the risk of dying in a car crash Fix your home
2 pCi/L About 32 people could get lung cancer 6 times the risk of dying from poison Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L
1.3 pCi/L About 20 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level) (Reducing radon  
evels below 2 pCi/L is difficult.)
0.4 pCi/L About 3 people could get lung cancer (Average outdoor radon level)
Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be lower. 
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003). 
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

Radon Risk If You’ve Never Smoked

Radon Level If 1,000 people who never smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*… The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**… WHAT TO DO:
20 pCi/L About 36 people could get lung cancer 35 times the risk of drowning Fix your home
10 pCi/L About 18 people could get lung cancer 20 times the risk of dying in a home fire Fix your home
8 pCi/L About 15 people could get lung cancer 4 times the risk of dying in a fall Fix your home
4 pCi/L About 7 people could get lung cancer The risk of dying in a car crash Fix your home
2 pCi/L About 4 person could get lung cancer The risk of dying from poison Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L
1.3 pCi/L About 2 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level) (Reducing radon levels below  
2 pCi/L is difficult.)
0.4 pCi/L   (Average outdoor radon level)
Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be higher. 
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003). 
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.